Monday, October 20, 2014

tweets

What @kinlane built today for Ada Lovelace Day: http://t.co/WHxfvoGVGp (You can add names via Github)

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/audreywatters/status/522228693049954304



"American troops [in Iraq] secretly reported finding roughly 5,000 chemical warheads, shells or aviation bombs."http://t.co/ml69ewE7Gu

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/nikhilgoya_l/status/522238776286789633
“We would have certainly included this case if we had known about it,” he said, “and not just for obvious medical reasons but because here was exactly the kind of wounds at the very heart of the reason the government sent our nation to war.”


http://www.fastcompany.com/3037098/fast-feed/eric-schmidt-the-next-google-is-out-there-in-a-garage-somewhere




http://www.salon.com/2014/10/13/north_america_is_a_crime_scene_the_untold_history_of_america/

posted on fb by carol
In the United States the legacy of settler colonialism can be seen in the endless wars of aggression and occupations; the trillions spent on war machinery, military bases, and personnel instead of social services and quality public education; the gross profits of corporations, each of which has greater resources and funds than more than half the countries in the world yet pay minimal taxes and provide few jobs for US citizens; the repression of generation after generation of activists who seek to change the system; the incarceration of the poor, particularly descendants of enslaved Africans; the individualism, carefully inculcated, that on the one hand produces self-blame for personal failure and on the other exalts ruthless dog-eat-dog competition for possible success, even though it rarely results; and high rates of suicide, drug abuse, alcoholism, sexual violence against women and children, homelessness, dropping out of school, and gun violence.
These are symptoms, and there are many more, of a deeply troubled society, and they are not new. The large and influential civil rights, student, labor, and women’s movements of the 1950s through the 1970s exposed the structural inequalities in the economy and the historical effects of more than two centuries of slavery and brutal genocidal wars waged against Indigenous peoples. For a time, US society verged on a process of truth seeking regarding past atrocities, making demands to end aggressive wars and to end poverty, witnessed by the huge peace movement of the 1970s and the War on Poverty, affirmative action, school busing, prison reform, women’s equity and reproductive rights, promotion of the arts and humanities, public media, the Indian Self-Determination Act, and many other initiatives.
A more sophisticated version of the race to innocence that helps perpetuate settler colonialism began to develop in social movement theory in the 1990s, popularized in the work of Michael Hardt and Antonio Negri. Commonwealth, the third volume in a trilogy, is one of a number of books in an academic fad of the early twenty-first century seeking to revive the Medieval European concept of the commons as an aspiration for contemporary social movements. Most writings about the commons barely mention the fate of Indigenous peoples in relation to the call for all land to be shared. 

Afghans resisting U.S. forces and others who happened to be in the wrong place at the wrong time were taken into custody, and most of them were sent to a hastily constructed prison facility on the U.S. military base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, on land the United States appropriated in its 1898 war against Cuba.
Rather than bestowing the status of prisoner of war on the detainees, which would have given them certain rights under the Geneva Conventions, they were designated as “unlawful combatants,” a status previously unknown in the annals of Western warfare. As such, the detainees were subjected to torture by U.S. interrogators and shamelessly monitored by civilian psychologists and medical personnel.

[..]
Political scientist Cynthia Enloe, who specializes in US foreign policy and the military, observes that US culture has become even more militarized since the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. Her analysis of this trend draws on a feminist perspective:
Militarization . . . [is] happening at the individual level, when a woman who has a son is persuaded that the best way she can be a good mother is to allow the military recruiter to recruit her son so her son will get off the couch. When she is persuaded to let him go, even if reluctantly, she’s being militarized. She’s not as militarized as somebody who is a Special Forces soldier, but she’s being militarized all the same. Somebody who gets excited because a jet bomber flies over the football stadium to open the football season and is glad that he or she is in the stadium to see it, is being militarized. So militarization is not just about the question “do you think the military is the most important part of the state?” (although obviously that matters). It’s not just “do you think that the use of collective violence is the most effective way to solve social problems?”—which is also a part of militarization. But it’s also about ordinary, daily culture, certainly in the United States.
[..]
 Price, like Enloe, sees an accelerated pace of militarization in the early twenty-first century: “Today’s weaponization of anthropology and other social sciences has been a long time coming, and post-9/11 America’s climate of fear coupled with reductions in traditional academic funding provided the conditions of a sort of perfect storm for the militarization of the discipline and the academy as a whole.”

I review @NaomiAKlein's This Changes Everything, "both a celebration and a critique of existing political movements."http://t.co/TbPPlTtkQl




from 2012



Nigeria (!!!) got right the hell on top of Ebola http://t.co/b2WGLqGG4Q and currently has no active cases??? @lucasgonzalez

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/leashless/status/522549738366050305


Like the GIFs we've shared so far? See more on our @tumblr page as we post along w/ the broadcast!http://t.co/0166oHQ66u #HowWeGottoNowPBS

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/PBS/status/522564122895192064


How the flashbulb changed the face of urban poverty (one of my favorite stories from #HowWeGotToNowPBS):https://t.co/Q4eE9L7PXB

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/stevenbjohnson/status/517672152544583681


This is a useful roundup on gamergate.  https://t.co/myMJPa0tBI

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/budtheteacher/status/522598142752333825


http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/10/20/holder-secrets
Poitras says that there is nothing she’d “rather do than be behind the camera with people, in real time, confronting life decisions.”
Snowden wrote to Poitras, “You asked why I chose you. I didn’t. You chose yourself.” He was referring to films of hers that were critical of the war on terror—in particular, a short piece on an N.S.A. whistle-blower named William Binney.
“She’s been kind to me, but there’s something deeper in her,” Scoggin said. “It’s this urgency to tell stories, to be a voice that is crying out, saying, ‘Wait, look at what is happening.’ It’s not yelling, it’s not strident, but it’s done with great conviction and force.”
She was exploring the idea of a movie with no plot, something nonlinear and indeterminate—a “Zeitgeist” film. “Plot is so relentless,” she said. “It’s totally unforgiving, and it also can be simplifying. It can provide resolution where there should be none. It can provide false catharsis.”


love your writing, @GeorgeMonbiot. here you are, in context: https://t.co/VRqDdrenkt

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/jerrymichalski/status/522604646439743488


“Re-imagining Cities” by @sverhulst https://t.co/aVfnjRHnHa cc @thegovlab

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/bethnoveck/status/522744405598298112


I often get this question: “By sharing your ideas openly aren’t you afraid they get copied?” My answer:http://t.co/IlU3Zr69MP

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/davehakkens/status/522747438617350144


Mexico’s missing students: were 43 attacked by cartel-linked police targeted for their activism? http://t.co/8doIxvHvOy

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/atenea_rv/status/522753953016987649



Not having early success on that one path messes with you. You get lumped in classes with kids with autism and Down Syndrome, and you look around and say, Okay, so this is where I’m at. Or you get put in the typical classes and you say, All right, I’m obviously not like these kids either. So you’re kind of nowhere. You’re just different. The system is broken. If we can streamline a multibillion-dollar company, we should be able to help kids who struggle the way I did.”

He’s so physically talented and good-looking and all that movie star stuff, but there’s a curiosity in him that originates in the fact that he really did struggle. Football didn’t stick. College didn’t stick. And yet he has the highest emotional intelligence of anyone I know. And he has the ability to teach others, including me, how to make decisions from that place.”

Pushing favorites—a non-secret but non-broadcast activity—to much higher visibility is not a great idea, @twitter. Violates expectations.

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/zeynep/status/522909387397283840


The Chinese word for "crisis" is comprised of two characters: one indicating "danger", the other "opportunity"

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/AndreIvanchuk/status/444573585227538432


Liberia needs 110,000 plastic gloves.. It has 2100. It needs 5000 plastic buckets. It has 116. http://t.co/cVUcmNKeaGhttp://t.co/5wNIvGOUeR

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/zeynep/status/523132255490048000






Solid nanoparticles can deform like a liquid: http://t.co/9rMXSjg3Qn http://t.co/YHscu1rKe9

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/MIT/status/523489995890253826






Was in audience watching @tedhope @SFIndieFilmFest panel when Ted asked if anyone had seen a short called @CainesArcade. I raised my hand.

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/nirvan/status/523701581678522368







http://specialneedsparenting.net/challenging-waves/

look up documentary - just add water







Remarkable. RT @conradhackett: US has more women in prison than China India & Russia combined

http://t.co/yEUacEROjV http://t.co/WLY4YfS9Yh

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/MaxMckeown/status/523944753080332289


"Peoples' openness to radical change is outpacing our ability to respond." http://t.co/k6UmAvNgqz

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/susie_c/status/523948857718484993


Henry Giroux on the Rise of Neoliberalism http://t.co/3QHvYZtsJa @therulesorg @naomiklein

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/alnoorladha/status/523982521252323328
What is at stake here is the notion that thinking is dangerous.
create the formative culture globally that allows people to understand that their interests are being trampled on, that they live in a political system that has been constructed by human beings and can be overturned by human beings, but also, a political, economic, and social system that has nothing to do with their needs, that basically exploits their needs, then people will not be moved to think critically and act collectively.

What an amazing speech by @jackandraka about leveling the informational playing field. Totally in awe.

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/MrMongillo/status/524197859487674368


My blog/video interview w. @Bali_Maha Connecting Learners Through Hashtags, Focal Pointshttp://t.co/BIaGKD6xX1 #ccourses

Original Tweet: https://twitter.com/hrheingold/status/524247720135913472